Chroniques de Féérune : la Quête des Origines

1385 DR : Spellplague (Magepeste)

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

1385 DR : Spellplague (Magepeste)

Message  le moine noir le Dim 24 Jan - 11:24

The Spellplague was a disaster that struck Realmspace on 29th Tarsakh, the Year of Blue Fire, 1385 DR, and was caused by Mystra's assassination at the hands of Cyric and Shar. With the goddess's death, the Weave, the universal structure of arcane forces, convulsed. It continued for a decade, leading to the Wailing Years, during which arcane magic ceased to function and the planet of Toril was transformed.

"The white queen is troubled but can't say why. The black queen hates the white and gives the assassin a black coat. The assassin steals upon the white queen. She can't see him gliding through the shadows. The sword screams. The white queen falls. Her city falls. Stones fall in the cavern to crush the soothsayer. The tree burns and thrashes in agony. Branches break. Branches twist and grow together...” — from a vision by the diviner Yaphyll

In her vision, Yaphyll referred to Mystra as the white queen and to Shar, goddess of the night, as the black queen. Cyric, god of murder, was the assassin, Savras, the god of divination, was the soothsayer[citation needed], and the city, cavern and tree symbolized the ordered structures of magic crumbling into chaos.

The breakdown of the Weave could be felt by all spellcasters across Faerûn. Magic went wild. Many wizards died or went mad or lost their ability to wield magic, many magic items and things built with magic collapsed or exploded or got twisted in unforeseen ways, and the very Realms themselves changed, with some countries or regions going away and other landscapes appearing in their place. New creatures appeared, earthmotes floated in the skies like hovering or slowly drifting aerial islands, and Everything Changed.

The Weave collapsed so completely and rapidly that Shar not only failed to gather up its fraying threads, she also lost control over the Shadow Weave, which was destroyed just like its counterpart. Many of the divine planes were shifted or destroyed as well in the cataclysm that ensued. Only greater deities prove strong enough to maintain their divine realms against the resultant chaos.

Sages in centuries to come mark the Weave’s destruction in the Year of Blue Fire as the end of the old world and the terrible beginning of the new.


Dernière édition par le moine noir le Jeu 2 Juin - 10:51, édité 3 fois
avatar
le moine noir

Messages : 478
Date d'inscription : 02/12/2007
Age : 43
Localisation : France

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Abeir, le royaume oublié

Message  le moine noir le Dim 24 Jan - 12:17

Abeir was one part of the prehistoric planet called Abeir-Toril. This world was unlike Toril in that it had no (or very few) gods. Instead, it was a world ruled over by primordials. Abeir is the realm forgotten. A twin to Toril and once joined with it, Abeir went its own way at the dawn of the world. Where gods and their servants oversee Faerûn, the lords of Abeir were towering primordials and elder wyrms, and savagery ruled with them. Now, after long epochs of separation, Abeir has joined with Toril once again, in a return both violent and unlooked-for.

During the Spellplague, both worlds merged for a certain time. Now almost a quarter of what used to be Abeir lies on Toril, and vice versa — which means that, for instance, Maztica still exists and some members of the Golden Legion were trapped in Abeir. The largest part of Abeir on Toril lay off the Sword Coast, in the Trackless Sea and was ruled by Dragons though their slaves included humans, dwarves, dragonborn, and, more rarely Tel'Quessir (elfes). The slave races were very rarely given to rebellion.

Tendrils of the Spellplague reached to many other corners of Toril, sometimes bypassing great swaths of land by infecting both sides of the many magical portals that dotted the world. Such an effect might have been responsible for drawing portions of the lost parallel world of Abeir into Toril. Some sages suggest that the two worlds have undergone periodic conjunctions ever since they diverged, but that these were too subtle for most creatures to notice. By an accident of timing, the Spellplague occurred during just such a conjunction, which caused the briefly overlapping lands to run athwart each other instead of effectively passing through each other while out of phase as before. Pockets of active Spellplague still exist today, most notoriously in the Plaguewrought Land. Each of these plaguelands is strange and dangerous. No two possess the exact same landscape or features, but entering any of them could lead to infection by the Spellplague. Luckily for the world, the remaining plaguelands possess only a small fraction of the Spellplague’s initial vigor and are in hard-to-reach locales, often surrounded by twisted devastation. Most lands of Faerûn and Returned Abeir are entirely free of such pockets, though the plaguechanged and spellscarred might appear in any land.


Dernière édition par le moine noir le Jeu 2 Juin - 10:56, édité 1 fois
avatar
le moine noir

Messages : 478
Date d'inscription : 02/12/2007
Age : 43
Localisation : France

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Chaos et destruction sur le continent de Faerûn

Message  le moine noir le Jeu 2 Juin - 10:56

As the cosmology of the planes is altered by the sweeping effects of the Spellplague, the two echo worlds of Abeir-Toril, the world of Faerie, also called the Feywild and the Plane of Shadow, also called the Shadowfell or just Shadow, move closer in conjunction with Toril and its counterpart Abeir. Travel between these echo worlds and Toril  becomes much more common than before the Spellplague and incursions across the now unstable planar barriers between them occur more frequently, leading to phenomenon like “worldfalls.”

Where once stood the realm of Sespech, the Golden Plains, and the Nagalands, the  passing of the Spellplague’s chaotic energies soon reveals a surreal landscape  breathtaking in its beauty, grandeur, and deadly changeability. For the next century, active Spellplague cavorts on this territory called the Plaguewrought Land, contorting terrain, natural law, and the very flesh of any creature that dares enter

The Spellplague ate through stone and earth as readily as flesh and magic. Broad portions of the continent of Faerûn collapsed into the Underdark, partially draining the Sea of Fallen Stars into the underground Glimmersea far below and leaving behind a gigantic pit called the Underchasm. The Underchasm is an expansive sinkhole formed by the collapse of a portion of Faerûn into the Underdark.

The Sea of Fallen Stars, the Shining Sea, and the Great Sea all feed the Underchasm by various waterways, so many of the walls in the depths are veiled in steaming cascades whose thunder is audible for miles. The upper  portions of the Underchasm’s sides host colonies of flying monsters and the occasional dragon. The lower portions hold vast numbers of bats and darker denizens. The northern section of the Underchasm partly undercuts the thick Chondalwood. The jungle has  begun to reach down into the dark, creating miles-long vines and massive roots ideal for climbing creatures. Junglemotes also float above the northern Underchasm. Several other earthmotes hover over other portions of the Underchasm, tunneled with chambers lined in luminescent fungus. Within such motes reside creatures normally confined to the deep earth, and treasures of the former Underdark are somewhat easier to reach.

he Spellplague splintered the Old Empires south of the drained sea into a wildscape of towering mesas, bottomless ravines, and cloud-scraping spires. Of those ancient kingdoms, the most changed by the Spellplague were Mulhorand, Unther, and Chondath, as well as portions of Aglarond, the shores of the Sea of Fallen Stars, and the plains of the Shaar. What was once the arcane realm called Halruaa was destroyed in a great holocaust, as if every spell held there had loosed its power simultaneously. The land  bridge between Chult and the Shining South was sunk; now only a scattered archipelago and a large island remains.

The gold dwarven kingdom of East Rift lies along the vast Underchasm, a cavity formed mostly between the Landrise and Great Rift in the Spellplague’s wake. The floor of what was once called the Great Rift is now a shelf on the side of the Underchasm. It has come to be called the East Rift. During the Underchasm’s fall, large portions of the Great Rift were destroyed or cut off. Fortunately for the dwarves of East Rift, the elemental portals that feed the Riftlake did not close. The lake, and rivers from the Eastern Shaar, kept the East Rift from becoming a forsaken land. Drow enclaves were also destroyed, including the city of Llurth Dreier. A few years after the collapse, dark elf refugees invaded the dwarven city of Underhome. The drow overran the city and still hold its lower regions. With the loss of Underhome, Eartheart has become the center of the gold dwarven lands. Underwatch, a fortress and village near Underhome, is a principal gateway that surface adventurers use when entering the exposed Underdark. Drow in the Underchasm  periodically test the dwarven defenses. Such a wide opening offers unheard-of opportunities for moving large forces to the surface all at once. Thus, the dwarves of East Rift must remain vigilant.

Once a vast savannah, the Shaar became a desert called the Shaar Desolation when the formation of the Underchasm cut off all fresh water flowing to the plains’ western regions. An increase in temperature as the water dried up furthered the plains’ decline. The land west of the East Rift is a vast dustbowl, most of its inhabitants dead or displaced into more livable lands. No hospitable settlements remain in the west. Shaarmid is abandoned and buried in sand dropped by unnatural storms. Rumors say that the dark serpent deity Sseth is transforming yuan-ti in ruined Lhesper, grooming them to be lords of the new desert. The snakemen enslave those who wander too far from Elfharrow. The Eastern Shaar remains habitable, however. Rivers still flow from the Uthangol Mountains and the shattered remains of the western Toadsquats. Nearby seas moderate the temperature. Nomadic human Shaaryans survive here, along with their native horses, but competition for resources, and the ravages of gnolls, keeps the population low.

The Kingdom of Cormyr in the Heartlands of Faerûn is struck hard by the effects of the Spellplague, but not so violently as many other nations such as Mulhorand and Unther, which effectively cease to exist. Roughly one third of all Cormyrean War Wizards are slain, driven mad, or simply go missing in the year following Mystra’s death.

The Temple of Mystra in Harrowdale in the Dalelands is destroyed when all the temple wards misfire simultaneously, killing head priestess Llewan Aspenhold and most of her Mystran clergy. Similar events occur at Mystran temples across Faerûn, essentially eradicating the once powerful Church of Mystra as a force for good on Toril. The Fall of Stars in Harrowdale is shrouded in a halo of blue flames for a full day, but otherwise seems untouched.

The Spellplague shattered the ancient elven High Magic that bound the efreet Memnon and the djinn Calim in the
Calimemnon Crystal.
The two were released, along with similarly bound elemental servants, many of whom were genasi. Ancient enemies, Calim and Memnon immediately picked up where they had left off—trying to annihilate each other. Many individuals presumed to be humans among the Calishite population revealed themselves as genasi and joined in the fight. Thousands more genasi, descendants of those scattered to the Lake of Steam, Tethyr, and Amn after the first Calishite djinn and efreet empires fell, returned and promptly declared for air or fire. Even some genasi out of the newly-arrived Abeiran realm of Akanûl joined the fight. The result was thousands dead, the Calim Desert’s expansion east across the Spider Swamp, and an explosion in the genasi population of the Realms. The period between the onset of the Spellplague and the Year of Holy Thunder (1450 DR) becomes known as the Second Era of Skyfire to the  beleaguered people of Calimshan.

Ancient kingdoms fell in the Spellplague’s aftermath, among them Mulhorand. Many of the Mulan people of that ancient kingdom were lost when the landscape rocked and changed. The few remaining Mulhorandi Mulan fled westwards to other lands, including Chessenta. Mulhorand’s pantheon of immigrant gods departed Toril as the Spellplague reshaped the cosmos. Only the deva, the mortal incarnations of the Mulhorandi  pantheon’s angelic servants, remained behind to seek out their own destinies in a transformed Faerûn. The geography of Mulhorand was altered  beyond recognition and made completely barren of civilization.

A descendant of the ancient Empire of Imaskar named Ususi Manaallin founded the new realm of High Imaskar in the territory that had once  been Mulhorand. She did so by relocating the ancient (and movable) Palace of the Purple Emperor from the Underdark home of Deep Imaskar to the wildscape of former Mulhorand. In the years to come, High Imaskar consolidated its hold on its new-claimed lands. Ususi was crowned Empress, the first Imaskari imperial sovereign since the last emperor, Yuvaraj, was slain in battle against the avatar of the Mulan deity Ra nearly 4,000 years before. Empress Ususi’s first dictate was to renounce the slavery practiced by her ancestors, and she outlawed slave ownership in High Imaskar on pain of death. She also set up the Body of Artificers, Planners, and Apprehenders, whose power was equal to and balanced hers.

The Spellplague was not kind to the kingdom of Halruaa, heir to ancient Netheril’s veneration of magic. Fully half of the land dissolved during the initial wave of blue fire. In the tsunamis, mudslides, and massive magical detonations that followed, the remainder of the nation was destroyed and transformed into a vast plagueland.

During the Spellplague, the Plateau of Thay rose thousands of feet above sea level, shattering the land and causing the Thaymount to erupt. Debris from melting glaciers on Thaymount spread more destruction. While these catastrophes raged, the undead Zulkir Szass Tam made himself the land’s regent. The Spellplague ended the civil war of the rebel zulkirs who lead the Red Wizards of Thay, though that order’s power was essentially broken. In the decades after the Spellplague, “Red Wizard” slowly lost its Thayan origin and became an appellation awarded to various mercantile enclaves around the Inner Sea and Moonsea regions that sold magic items and other magical services. These enclaves were the descendants of the defunct Thayan Guild of Foreign Trade.

As with most folk who survived the Wailing Years, Lionel Carrathal spent the next two decades after the Spellplague picking up the pieces and trying to rebuild his life. Through hard work and some underhanded dealings, Carrathal once again worked his way up through Amnian society, still determined to reestablish his family in the Moonshaes.

The Kingdom of Impiltur’s royal line failed with the death of the paladin King Imbrar II during the Year of Blue Fire. In his place, the nation was ruled by a ragged Grand Council composed of lords from the remaining Impilturan cities. People talk longingly of restoring a monarchy to the land—”The king will come and put things right, you’ll see”—but for now everything keeps getting worse. Impiltur is currently in the grip of a fanatical cult of demon-worshipers, who cause no end of trouble. The Grand Council’s efforts to locate the cult’s leaders and combat its depredations have proven woefully inadequate to date. The demon cult currently running wild in Impiltur is called the Fraternity of Tharos. The group takes its name from the ancient Nar capital of Dun-Tharos in the Great Dale’s northern forest, Dunwood. The name also reveals the source of Impiltur’s demonic contamination—the demons loosed in that northern forest by the destruction of their ancient bonds when the Rotting Man, the goddess of disease Talona’s Chosen, was defeated before the Spellplague. The Fraternity inducts new members by requiring them to kidnap an innocent victim from among Impiltur’s populace, then slay that victim in a bloody ritual calling upon various demonic names scribed with fire in the Abyssal artifact called the Demonstone. The Demonstone lies at the top of a windowless tower in the Impilturan port city of New Sarshel. The tower’s exterior is a bland, unexceptional gray; its interior is filled with all manner of demonic horrors.

When the surface lands partially collapsed into the Underdark during the Spellplague, the smoldering volcanoes in the Smoking Mountains to the south of the land of Chessenta touched off, as did Mount Thulbane to the north. From the Smoking Mountains, various disturbed creatures ravaged northward. In the north, the vampiric green dragon Jaxanaedegor was freed to forage even during the day, since the sun was obscured by an ashen sky. Faced with monstrous invasions so soon after massive upheaval and changes to the land, Chessenta nearly collapsed. The only Chessentan city-state not devastated and broken was Luthcheq.

Much of what was formerly known as the Chultan Peninsula was drowned and became the island of Chult when the Spellplague radically reshaped southern Faerûn, causing sea levels to rapidly rise as whole sections of the continent were simply erased by the mystical blue fire. In the Year of Blue Fire, the Chultan jungle was interpenetrated by  pockets of Abeiran landscape that now lie scattered in the skies and the forests. Strange, savage behemoths now prowl the shadowed jungles and wandering motes alike. Several Chultan human tribes were hunted to extinction by these voracious new predators; those that remain have learned new methods of coexistence. The yuan-ti kingdom of Serpentes fell in the course of the change, the human kingdom of Samarach was submerged, and the ancient city of Mezro collapsed into the earth, its population scattered.

The great tsunamis that followed the shifting continents during the Spellplague inundated the island kingdom of Lantan, long dedicated to Gond, the god of craft, as it ravaged other coasts and island nations. When the water receded, the island land was nearly gone. All its machines, its marvelous Gond-wrought technology, and its people—Lantanese humans and gnomes alike—were drowned. The land is much reduced in area, and its clockwork marvels lie rusting below the waves. The pirates of Nelanther say a monster sinks any ship that draws near.

The island of Nimbral, also known as the Sea Haven, founded centuries ago by Halruaans who worshiped the lost goddess of deception Leira, was southwest of Lantan in the Trackless Sea. Like Lantan, Nimbral vanished without a trace after the cataclysmic waves subsided. Concentrations of powerful magic were a hazard in the early days of the Spellplague, and Nimbral certainly had magic enough. Some people think the isle still exists, cloaked in illusion. Others think it drowned in the sea, or that its veils of magic carried it off into some far plane. Whatever the truth of the matter, no ships have found the island in almost one hundred years.

The island of Evermeet, the great home of the eladrin and elven races off the coast of Faerûn, is widely considered to have perished in the Spellplague like Lantan and  Nimbral. Even Evermeet’s closest allies, the fey kingdoms in Faerûn, lost contact with Evermeet after the Spellplague. With the failure of all arcane portals, embassies, and attempts to reestablish contact, common wisdom on Toril now has it that Evermeet has  been utterly destroyed.

The once-thriving city of Neverwinter along the northern Sword Coast was destroyed in the aftermath of the Spellplague, eventually becoming an extensive series of ruins picked over by adventurers.
avatar
le moine noir

Messages : 478
Date d'inscription : 02/12/2007
Age : 43
Localisation : France

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Waterdeep et Baldur's gate

Message  le moine noir le Jeu 2 Juin - 11:16

Waterdeep was spared many of the ravages experienced by other cities during the Spellplague. However, the event did introduce several lesser phenomena to the City of Splendors. Hundreds of glowing globes (floating, mobile spheres of continual radiance) now drift freely around Waterdeep. Although every mage and sage who has studied them insists the spheres of light are not sentient, they behave uncannily as if they are. They seem to become curious, and for a random time, follow certain beings who are moving about the city; they always seem drawn to any release or casting of magic; and they seem to become excited, gathering and rushing wildly about, if anyone tries to move or harness them by magical means. A few of the fabled Walking Statues of Waterdeep went wild, striding across the city until they collapsed, toppled, or got wedged between buildings. Some were later quarried away into nothingness, but a few remain, forever frozen. One invisible local change wrought by the Spellplague is all too familiar to local spellcasters: Detection and location magic no longer functions. Such spells feature in old tales but are unknown in life today. In the years after the Spellplague the lower sewers and the uppermost level of Undermountain become Waterdeep’s newest neighborhood, inhabited by the most desperate and yet most capable: broke adventurers. They dwell in its dark chambers, moving about often, skulking and lurking to avoid monsters and thefts or attacks by their neighbors. They make their living by raiding up into the city by night, trading in illicit goods, temporarily “hiding” persons and stolen items, and delving into Undermountain. Downshadow folk are both greatly feared and greatly admired by other Waterdhavians. Waterdeep also gained an entirely new city ward in the decades after the Spellplague: Field Ward. This district is home to folk of all walks of life who lacked coin enough to hire lodgings or own buildings in old Waterdeep, but who first arrived as the ravages of the Spellplague began. It is a slum in some places, and a struggling middle-class area in others. The Field Ward is a noisy, lively area that is home to poor (and a few wealthy) eladrin and elves, half-bloods of all sorts (and anyone who has a deformity or visible taint from the Spellplague), and dwarves who are determined to get the respect they are sure they deserve. The vast and dangerous subterranean Labyrinth of Undermountain still underlies Waterdeep. The city was prevented from collapsing into Undermountain in part because of the titanic magical wards established in the dim past; these same forces largely fended off the Spellplague. The underways still connect with the wider Underdark, full of adventure and treasure for those who dare to explore them. Much has changed in the dark underground smugglers’ town of Skullport and Undermountain since the death of Halaster Blackcloak a century ago. Persistent wild magic seems to drift around the Underhalls, rather like living spells. It sometimes recharges magic items taken down into Skullport, or even alters the abilities and powers of living beings. As a result, Skullport is much visited but no longer inhabited; much of its lawlessness has relocated to the Mistshore and Undercliff, two other new neighborhoods of the City of Splendors. Over the last century, Deepwater Harbor has become badly polluted, its waters brown and stinking. The north shore of the former Naval Harbor became a beaching ground (and then a scuttling yard) for damaged or age-rotted ships. Over the years, these hulks piled up one atop another, spreading out from the shore at the foot of Coin Alley for a long way into the harbor to form the Mistshore. This area is a permanent slum of sagging, ramshackle woodwork atop the heap of sunken ships, where the most disfigured, diseased, spellscarred, and monstrous of Waterdeep’s inhabitants now dwell. The Mistshore is the darkest and wildest neighborhood in Waterdeep, where open violence and lawlessness is frequent and the Watch patrols seldom (and then only at double strength or more). Drunken and beaten-up inhabitants can often be seen sprawled or draped over the rotting riggings that line the winding “streets.” Undercliff is by far the largest and most open new part of Waterdeep. It sprawls over the meadows east of the plateau occupied by the old city, under the cliff that still forms its eastern edge. Undercliff is large, rather lawless, and still growing; it is home to every sort of new arrival (for the last fifty years or so). Undercliff is the most fluid neighborhood of Waterdeep, where people move frequently, shanties often collapse or are torn down or torched, and change rules. Increasingly, dwarves dwelling in Field Ward who have made enough coin are seeking to buy houses in Mountainside, and on the cliff face above Undercliff, so they can tunnel out larger abodes at will. Their diggings have already breached some sewers and cellars in the city. Their activities are beginning to attract the attention of the Masked Lords of Waterdeep, who are now sending down hired adventurers to patrol the uppermost levels of Undermountain to stop the illicit delvings.

Untouched by the Spellplague, the city-state of Baldur’s Gate on the Sword Coast received an influx of refugees from the south that greatly swelled its population in the months and years following the disaster. Word soon spread—not entirely accurately— that Baldur’s Gate was an “open city,” a safe haven for refugees from south of the Sea of Fallen Stars—particularly for the Mulan survivors of the destruction of Mulhorand and Unther. The trickle of displaced people soon became a flood, and the city nearly collapsed under the weight of a population that doubled, then tripled in size, eventually surpassing Calimport as the largest city in Faerûn.
avatar
le moine noir

Messages : 478
Date d'inscription : 02/12/2007
Age : 43
Localisation : France

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

La théocratie de l'Elturgard

Message  le moine noir le Jeu 2 Juin - 11:17

The theocracy of Elturgard in the Western Heartlands is forged from the formerly independent city-states of Elturel, Iriaebor, Scornubel, Triel, and Berdusk. The capital of the realm is established in Elturel and the theocracy as a whole is controlled by the Church of Torm, the god of law, and his most powerful clergyman, the High Observer. Over the years, hundreds of people fleeing a mummy’s curse, a vampire lord’s service, or some other undead involvement have arrived here, settling in Elturel in particular. The forests surrounding this land have grown wild and dangerous. A pocket of plagueland festering several miles to the south has a habit of spewing forth occasional monstrosities. Elturgard is a theocracy ruled by those who are certain they walk the path of righteousness. The paladins of this land take pride in their moral clarity and pursuit of good. Elturgard is dominated by a “second sun” called the Companion or Amauntaor’s Gift that hovers eternally in the sky above the city of Elturel, making this a realm of endless daylight. The Companion was a miracle of Amaunator’s created before the Spellplague that was intended to herald Lathander’s reincarnation as the ancient sun god. Creatures of darkness cannot abide even the sight of the city. Unlike most nations of the Realms, Elturgard has a state religion: Torm is revered in the temples that dot the landscape. Elturel is the capital of the wider kingdom it claims. The High Observer of Torm keeps order within the city and the wider realm through a knighthood of paladins who share Elturgard’s goal of one day bringing righteous judgment to all Faerûn. Numerous citizens dream of joining the knighthood, and many succeed. Though not all serve the same god, as Amaunator, Ilmater and Bahamut also have strong followings in the land, all have sworn oaths to Elturgard and wear the blazing insignia of the Companion. Yet, in some quarters, Elturgard has garnered a reputation for being too righteous. Many problems attend its inflexible laws, inquisitorial persecution of evil, and bold plans for “setting Faerûn aright.”
avatar
le moine noir

Messages : 478
Date d'inscription : 02/12/2007
Age : 43
Localisation : France

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: 1385 DR : Spellplague (Magepeste)

Message  Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut


 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum